Tag Archives: Corrs

The Corrs Live at the Marquee, Cork, June 2016

Two days after the Corrs played the Marquee, Cork and I’m still reeling. I have never felt such profound happiness, love, devotion and respect in all my life. Absolutely every little thing that happened at the concert was nothing short of amazing.

Where do I start?!

A Corrs fan from the word go, as a teenager I dreamed about the life the Corrs lived. Their astounding beauty and style coupled with their amazing music had me spellbound. How exquisite were Sharon Corr’s violin melodies? How angelic were Andrea’s vocals? How utterly mind-blowing was Caroline’s drumming? And how much did Jim rock his black and white Fender Strat and every other instrument he put his hands on?! I was ever-so-mildly obsessed!

Lansdowne Road happened. My first concert and my first time seeing the Corrs in real-life. I was truly smitten.

Next time I saw them was 2004 in the Point, Dublin. A very polite concert- in complete contrast to the dancing and celebrating in Lansdowne Road, the audience sat and clapped. I just wanted to scream “I love you Jim!!!” Nevermind- my sister did that for me! Jim looked up into the seating area in our direction in bewildered amusement!

Fast forward to 2016. January saw their spirited return to the Point. I have already blogged about that amazing night: Bring on the Night- The Corrs Dazzling Homecoming Gig, Dublin 28-01-16 | Audio_Girl so no need to delay, let’s talk about Cork!

That evening something amazing happened and we found ourselves invited backstage to meet and greet! How incredibly LUCKY were we?!!! We jumped up and down in excitement, fixed our hair, lashed on perfume and wondered out loud what on Earth were we going to say to the Corrs?!!!

When we got backstage we were in awe of our surroundings. The Corrs crew were like a family and were so warm and friendly to us. My knees went weak when I caught a glimpse of Jim peeping his head out of the band-room. There was my greatest inspiration!!!

When he came out, he was beaming. His smile broke my heart there and then (in the nicest possible way!). He looked ultra-cool in his black and white kicks, black jeans and grey camo t-shirt. Sporting a sexy, scruffy stubble and his hair spiked up, he was the picture of youthful joy and well-being.

I watched Jim (open-mouthed!) talking to the other lucky fans and suddenly manager John Hughes was by my side, chatting to us. I recognised him immediately. A moment after he drifted off, Andrea literally bounced over to us, talking excitedly about our pizza party she seen online while she was on her way down! She talked to us like a giggling school-girl and busily signed our merchandise and posed for selfies. Caroline was with her, much quieter and reserved  but eager to say hello and graciously signed autographs and allowed photos. I was astounded by her natural beauty- herself and Andrea were total goddesses!

 

Breathless I turned around when I heard a very familiar voice “hiya Steffy!” there was Jim Corr himself smiling at me! I think I managed to squeak out a “hi” and threw my arms around him! He gave me the best hug of my life! We had our picture taken immediately and I introduced my boyfriend. Autograph signed during relaxed chitchat, I felt like we were talking to an old friend. I forgot it was the Jim Corr talking to us, it seemed like a garden party or a bbq and Jim was about to offer us a burger! He asked ME about my music and I managed to squeak something out! I gave him a soft teddy with a rose- a gesture of my humble love for him which he thanked me for 3 times!

 

Time to be moving out, the Corrs had to be on stage shortly! Sharon was talking fluent Spanish to a fan, I politely waited- enthralled by the sound of her voice. I loved her green sparkly eyeshadow- I told her so and she seemed genuinely pleased, having done it herself!  She signed my White Light album twice (it was raining- she apologised for it! Good gracious lady, no need to apologise for that!) and let me take a photo! This was my second time meeting her and she was every bit as lovely and beautiful as I remembered!

 

Hurrying out I heard a shout “Hey Steffy!!!” I turned and Anto Drennan himself hurried toward me! Anto Drennan the legend himself recognised me!!!! We got a quick photo and a quick “great to see you again!” before we had to part ways! The Corrs were late for the stage and it was my fault! 😛 I still can’t believe my guitar hero called ME- what a perfect gentleman!!!!

 

Back in the Marquee, the Corrs did not disappoint! The concert was every bit as magical as the Point earlier this year. The band were tight, flawless and nothing short of insanely talented. One thing different from the Point was that the Corrs smiled much, much more this time. They never stopped smiling all night!!! The crowd out-sang the band during Runaway moving Andrea to near tears- her voice cracking in emotion. We danced the night away, bopping to our favourite Talk on Corners songs, Anto shredding his guitar solos like the string god that he is famous for, Keith Duffy pounding the bass through our hearts and each Corr shining on their instruments. The vocal harmonies were stellar- especially during Kiss of Life (my favourite track from White Light), those chorus “oohs” gave me goosebumps which still haven’t worn off yet.

 

The icing on an already amazing day was when the lovely security man gave me Jim’s setlist! I’ve always wanted one! I pressed it to my chest in pure joy and the people around me smiled- a stranger walking up to me saying “You deserve that setlist! I’m glad you got it!” Corrs fans are truly the nicest people on the planet!

 

 

 

The Corrs are amazingly kind and generous to have gifted us with these memories.

The Corrs give the world so much with their thoughtful, mature and poignant music.

The Corrs make the world a better place and inspire their fans to do the same and to enjoy life.

This is why the Corrs are so successful.  White light surrounds them and they are earth angels.

Preview, buy and download songs from the album White Light, including ”I Do What I Like”, ”Bring On the Night”, ”White Light” and many more. Buy the album for €10.99. Songs start at €1.29: White Light by The Corrs on iTunes

 

 

 

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Music and National Identity

This week’s blog considers the role of music in national identity; is it important that countries have a national anthem and are there any contemporary musical genres based around national identity? This blog also considers if contemporary youth are aware of their national identity.

A countries’ national anthem is in essence, a musical flag. It expresses to other countries the unity of it’s people and what they stand for. People take great pride in their national anthem and it can provoke strong, emotional reactions. Take for example the Olympics this year, how many athletes did we see, women AND men, standing strong, waiting to receive their medals, crumble and cry when their countries national anthem came on?! Lots! I personally found that very touching.

Let’s talk about contemporary musical genres based on national identity. The first that springs to my mind is Irish pop/rock. Take the lovely Corrs from our very own Dundalk who have a huge fan base all over the world. Of course anyone who knows me or who reads my blogs knows I was quite the “Corr-razy” fan in my early teens and I still love their music to this day.

I loved that the Corrs fused typically Irish in style melodies (some traditional, some composed by themselves) the Irish language and Irish traditional instruments (the fiddle, tin whistle, bodhrán, accordian and even uilleann pipes) with contemporary pop and rock. “Toss the Feathers” which was released on their debut album (1995) is a great example of a traditional Irish tune blended with rock. It’s exciting, catchy and very Irish! No matter what country in the world you come from, you know instantly that this is music from Ireland!

This next song influenced me in so many ways as a teenager, as a violin player, as a songwriter, it fuelled an appreciation and understanding of great songwriting and it still does. Irish traditional instruments and melodies are laced with pop and rock perfectly. I still love that funky muted rock guitar in the verses and the vocal production and that sweet drum sound. Everything about this song is perfect. It sounds as awesome to me now as it did 16 years ago. The entire album remains one of my all time favourites.

I could write forever about the Corrs’ use of Ireland’s national identity in their music, they continued to weave Irish traditional in their music right up to their most recent album “Home” (2005). I remember being at their massive concert in Lansdowne Road, Dublin in 1999 as a 15 year old and enjoying watching the fans Irish dancing, there was a real sense of national identity and a real pride to be Irish that night. It was a beautiful and rocking show!

Sharon, Andrea and Jim Corr
Sharon, Andrea and Jim Corr

The Corrs have enjoyed global success with their unique blend of traditional/celtic/folk/pop/rock/alternative music, other artists which incorporate traditional Irish identity into their contemporary music would be the Pogues, the Horslips, to a lesser degree the Cranberries (for Dolores O’Riordans’ strong Limerick accent in her vocal performance and her lyrics which occasionally were about Irish politics), Sinéad O’Connor, Enya, Clannad, Mairín Fahy etc.

Israel’s modern music is strongly linked with their national identity. Jewish and non Jewish music traditions are fused with pop, jazz and rock etc. Modern songs are fused with the traditional canonical style of singing and music (use of minor and modal keys, strong off-beat rhythms, darbuka and tambourine instruments and lyrics about Israeli life).

Cool darbuka rhythms above!

A really good example of Israeli national identity within music is Rita, an artist who sings in her native Persian language and uses traditional instruments with pop. Her music, along with most other Western music is banned in Iran yet she is extremely popular with both peoples. Check out her recent hit “Shane” .

Lastly I will briefly talk about the importance of national identity in the age of the Internet. I’ve been asked to consider if it is important to young people in the global village. I would say yes, that it is very important. This is just my personal opinion, I haven’t done any research, I think that would be an interesting project in itself! 😉

I believe that people from different countries enjoy sharing music and culture through the use of the social media. Every day I see in my Facebook feed photos, witty jokes, status updates and music in various languages. I have a lovely circle of friends from Germany, Lithuania, Poland, Italy, New Zealand, Latvia, Mauritius, China, Malaysia, Taiwan, as well as other English speaking countries- America, Canada, Australia and the U.K. I find through Facebook that young people are quick to show their pride for their country, even if they aren’t living in their country of birth.

Again I’m thinking of the Olympics- wasn’t Facebook and Twitter feed FULL of national pride during the events?!

I hope this makes my readers think about their national identities and I hope they feel proud of their culture and heritage! I believe the Internet has made the world a smaller place but this has not diminished national identities in any way.

Peace out.

The Role of the Teenager in Society; Rebellion and Popular Music.

This week’s blog considers the role of the teenager in society over the past 100 years and the importance of popular music to the teenager.

Popular music became a commodity in the early 20th century with the invention of radio and the mechanical reproduction of music. In 1927 the B.B.C created their music department, broadcasting new and different styles beyond community-based music into homes across the U.K. Music became a personal possession to be enjoyed at will, not just at church at other family events.

Families in the 1920’s gathered around the radio. Source: http://rtf305-f10-07885-atm645.blogspot.ie/2010/09/rtf-blog-3.html

The concept of the teenager is relatively new. Before the 1940’s, children finished primary school and went straight into the world of work. 12 year olds were fast tracked into adulthood and responsibilities. Fun and free-time were unheard of. Only the privileged finished secondary school during the 1940’s and those who did attend school, had to work  after school hours.

In the years following World War II, British popular music was nonexistent. Society had changed and teenagers had expendable income. The fresh, exciting music of white performers such as Elvis Presley became dominant on radios and television screens instantly. Rock n roll was a commercial product. Artists connected with young people by dressing like them and for the first time ever, young people felt they could relate with music stars. The performances of Elvis were broadcast on television with shots of the excited and emotional faces of the audience, young people were an integral part of the show. These pictures showed other fans how to respond to rock n roll.

The artist/fan connection. Elvis and the teenagers. Source: http://overlookpress.tumblr.com/post/29569651750/in-interviews-elvis-said-that-his-jittery

But rock n roll was not without controversy. It’s musical origins were founded in African/American music and it was associated with devil dancing and black magic rituals. Parents were outraged, it caused damage to the moral fabric of white U.S society and record companies attempted to clean up the image of rock n roll.

The exciting nature of the music combined with the newly discovered artist/fan connection created a desire among teenagers to rebel against their parents, dress differently, go dancing, have fun.

This trend for desire for rebellion and opposition to parents continued every decade with new genres of music. Music became the voice for the youth generation and became very important with one’s identity and expression. 

But does this still exist today? Is music still as important to today’s teenagers as a voice? My personal belief is no, music is not as important for expressing the desire for rebellion and parental opposition.

I have asked my 14 year old sister (on Facebook!) some questions regarding her feelings about music. She listens to all types of popular music, neither preferring one genre to another, her iPod holds dance, pop, rock, dubstep and indie music. She’s told me that teenagers can’t go a day without listening to music and that music itself is important to her and her peers. She doesn’t believe teenagers listen to music to rebel anymore, she adds that “loud” teenagers generally listen to dance and trance music because these genres are played in the discos.

Perhaps at 14 years of age, rebellion isn’t something teenagers have even considered yet.

When I was 13/14 I listened to the pop music of the charts (The Corrs and Robbie Williams pretty much sums it up!), I enjoyed the Corrs because I was learning violin and thought it was cool that a pop band incorporated Irish traditional style melodies with pop and rock and also the fact they were from Dundalk, only 20 minutes up the road from my house! I remember it was my Dad who gave me their first album “Forgiven Not Forgotten”.

The Corrs “Forgiven Not Forgotten” album

But the first genre of popular music I became independently interested in was hard rock. I was 15 and just started Transition Year in school. I was making new friends (I was previously very shy and quiet and spent my lunchtimes in the library!) and these people introduced me to hard rock. I have already talked about this introduction to rock music in a  post last week.

I liked the guitars (I had just started learning guitar) and the fast paced music. I remember loving the look of horror on my parents faces when I told them I thought Metallica were brilliant! They were shocked and thought it was literally the devil’s music! I remember watching a VHS (yes a video tape!) at home of Metallica and my Dad walking in, giving out that I was listening to such music. A week later the VHS machine broke and he blamed the Metallica tape for ruining the machine! He said James Hetfield was inside the machine and personally broke it on purpose! Of course, this was partly in jest (my Dad was not THAT crazy! haha!)

Metallica VHS!

But this music became my identity for my teenage years and early twenties. My fashion was Metallica t-shirts, various dog collar necklaces, studded bracelets, fishnet tights, ripped jeans (flared of course) and of course long, long hair. It was very important to me to express myself as a rocker (or “Rock Head” my Dad used to call me!) and this was very apparent in my own creativity in music.

In my late teens I joined a girl rock band in Dublin and my rocker personality had a huge influence on the group. For my audition in the Temple Bar Music Centre (now called the Button Factory) I played Metallica’s “The Four Horsemen” for them. I remember the look of pure surprise on their faces and that satisfied me, it was unusual 10 years ago for a girl to play heavy metal guitar and that made me feel unique.

It’s safe to say I still enjoy this kind of music. My musical taste has broadened a lot since then. I never purely committed myself to rock/metal as a teenager, I did secretly continue to listen to the Corrs and various other pop/dance artists. I still deeply love the music of Metallica and other hard rock artists but I do find myself seeking out new rock bands these days. My fashion sense has also broadened since! It’s actually pretty rare that I wear a band t-shirt these days, but I when I go out I still wear the smokey eye makeup, teased hair and rocker boots! I still keep photographs of Metallica on my wall.

The memory remains!