Tag Archives: rock n roll

Catch the Full Moon Boogie Band in Cork and Dundalk this January!

A WOP BAM A LU WOP A WOP BAM BOO!!!

The Full Moon Boogie Band are on the road and are on their way to a town near YOU!

We are a five piece band, made up of passionate, energetic and professional musicians, playing songs from Elvis to Rihanna, Wanda Jackson to Beyoncé, all with a full moon rock n roll flavour.

This Sunday we are playing The Spectacular Vintage Wedding Fair in lovely Corks’ The Imperial Hotel cork with Escape Salon & Spa… There’s gonna be tons of gorgeous vintage style clothing, yummy food and of course bopping’ tunes.. Do come along and if you’re looking for something a little authentic for your Big Day, tis the perfect place for ya!

Cork Sunday 20-01-13
Boppin at Cork this Sunday 20-01-13

We are also heading up to Dundalk next Friday the 25th of January for a good old fashioned, rock n roll show at the Spirit Store! We promise to create an awesome party atmosphere with our rockabilly sound! Check out the Facebook event here: Fri 25th January Full Moon Boogie Band Tickets €5.

Come along, you don’t want to miss these shows!

Party time!
Party time!
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The Role of the Teenager in Society; Rebellion and Popular Music.

This week’s blog considers the role of the teenager in society over the past 100 years and the importance of popular music to the teenager.

Popular music became a commodity in the early 20th century with the invention of radio and the mechanical reproduction of music. In 1927 the B.B.C created their music department, broadcasting new and different styles beyond community-based music into homes across the U.K. Music became a personal possession to be enjoyed at will, not just at church at other family events.

Families in the 1920’s gathered around the radio. Source: http://rtf305-f10-07885-atm645.blogspot.ie/2010/09/rtf-blog-3.html

The concept of the teenager is relatively new. Before the 1940’s, children finished primary school and went straight into the world of work. 12 year olds were fast tracked into adulthood and responsibilities. Fun and free-time were unheard of. Only the privileged finished secondary school during the 1940’s and those who did attend school, had to work  after school hours.

In the years following World War II, British popular music was nonexistent. Society had changed and teenagers had expendable income. The fresh, exciting music of white performers such as Elvis Presley became dominant on radios and television screens instantly. Rock n roll was a commercial product. Artists connected with young people by dressing like them and for the first time ever, young people felt they could relate with music stars. The performances of Elvis were broadcast on television with shots of the excited and emotional faces of the audience, young people were an integral part of the show. These pictures showed other fans how to respond to rock n roll.

The artist/fan connection. Elvis and the teenagers. Source: http://overlookpress.tumblr.com/post/29569651750/in-interviews-elvis-said-that-his-jittery

But rock n roll was not without controversy. It’s musical origins were founded in African/American music and it was associated with devil dancing and black magic rituals. Parents were outraged, it caused damage to the moral fabric of white U.S society and record companies attempted to clean up the image of rock n roll.

The exciting nature of the music combined with the newly discovered artist/fan connection created a desire among teenagers to rebel against their parents, dress differently, go dancing, have fun.

This trend for desire for rebellion and opposition to parents continued every decade with new genres of music. Music became the voice for the youth generation and became very important with one’s identity and expression. 

But does this still exist today? Is music still as important to today’s teenagers as a voice? My personal belief is no, music is not as important for expressing the desire for rebellion and parental opposition.

I have asked my 14 year old sister (on Facebook!) some questions regarding her feelings about music. She listens to all types of popular music, neither preferring one genre to another, her iPod holds dance, pop, rock, dubstep and indie music. She’s told me that teenagers can’t go a day without listening to music and that music itself is important to her and her peers. She doesn’t believe teenagers listen to music to rebel anymore, she adds that “loud” teenagers generally listen to dance and trance music because these genres are played in the discos.

Perhaps at 14 years of age, rebellion isn’t something teenagers have even considered yet.

When I was 13/14 I listened to the pop music of the charts (The Corrs and Robbie Williams pretty much sums it up!), I enjoyed the Corrs because I was learning violin and thought it was cool that a pop band incorporated Irish traditional style melodies with pop and rock and also the fact they were from Dundalk, only 20 minutes up the road from my house! I remember it was my Dad who gave me their first album “Forgiven Not Forgotten”.

The Corrs “Forgiven Not Forgotten” album

But the first genre of popular music I became independently interested in was hard rock. I was 15 and just started Transition Year in school. I was making new friends (I was previously very shy and quiet and spent my lunchtimes in the library!) and these people introduced me to hard rock. I have already talked about this introduction to rock music in a  post last week.

I liked the guitars (I had just started learning guitar) and the fast paced music. I remember loving the look of horror on my parents faces when I told them I thought Metallica were brilliant! They were shocked and thought it was literally the devil’s music! I remember watching a VHS (yes a video tape!) at home of Metallica and my Dad walking in, giving out that I was listening to such music. A week later the VHS machine broke and he blamed the Metallica tape for ruining the machine! He said James Hetfield was inside the machine and personally broke it on purpose! Of course, this was partly in jest (my Dad was not THAT crazy! haha!)

Metallica VHS!

But this music became my identity for my teenage years and early twenties. My fashion was Metallica t-shirts, various dog collar necklaces, studded bracelets, fishnet tights, ripped jeans (flared of course) and of course long, long hair. It was very important to me to express myself as a rocker (or “Rock Head” my Dad used to call me!) and this was very apparent in my own creativity in music.

In my late teens I joined a girl rock band in Dublin and my rocker personality had a huge influence on the group. For my audition in the Temple Bar Music Centre (now called the Button Factory) I played Metallica’s “The Four Horsemen” for them. I remember the look of pure surprise on their faces and that satisfied me, it was unusual 10 years ago for a girl to play heavy metal guitar and that made me feel unique.

It’s safe to say I still enjoy this kind of music. My musical taste has broadened a lot since then. I never purely committed myself to rock/metal as a teenager, I did secretly continue to listen to the Corrs and various other pop/dance artists. I still deeply love the music of Metallica and other hard rock artists but I do find myself seeking out new rock bands these days. My fashion sense has also broadened since! It’s actually pretty rare that I wear a band t-shirt these days, but I when I go out I still wear the smokey eye makeup, teased hair and rocker boots! I still keep photographs of Metallica on my wall.

The memory remains!

The Minutes Headline New Day Risings Birthday Bash

The Minutes released their debut album “Marcata” on leading Irish independent label Model Citizen Records in May earlier this year, and last night the juggernaut rolled into the seaside village of Blackrock, Dundalk, Co. Louth to headline promoters and defenders of Irish music talent New Day Risings second birthday bash in proper rock’n’ roll fashion. The band have been touring extensively in Ireland playing top music festivals and shows in Europe and the U.S all summer.

The Dublin trio freshly anointed as “the greatest rock n roll band in Dublin” by influential UK magazine Artrocker, delivered an energetic, raw, in-your-face set to a full house of rock ‘ n’ rollers, music fans and an eclectic mix of Halloween spooks following fantastic performances from special guests Tin Pot Operation (Belfast new wave/punk/reggae), The Holy Ghost Explosion (Dundalk alternative rock) and 2Minutes2Midnight (Dundalk rock).

Mark Austin delivers

Opening with “Black and Blue”, drummer Shane Kinsella (the one with sideburns the size of Tasmania!) immediately engaged the crowd with the unmistakable drum intro that commands the listener to throw various shapes, voluntary or not! Loud, raw and powerful, the Minutes sweat their way through an urgent 13 song set of which included fantastic crowd interaction (singer/guitarist Mark Austin calling the audiences vocal participation as “sexually superb” on “Black Keys” and “Fleetwood” especially), brilliantly structured songs, thumping drums, screaming guitars, and hollering vocals (bass player Tom Cosgrave- the tall, cool one, added perfect harmony).

It was a personal delight of mine to hear a proper rock band play proper rock on properly looked after instruments! The kick drum was a thing of musical beauty which stood out to me, properly tuned drums despite the brutal attack they received at the end (see photos below!). The truly professional band employ an eager stage-hand who sweat every bit as much as Austin during the show, picking up falling microphones, swapping guitars, tending to every detail to ensure the Minutes delivered an unforgettable show safely and smoothly. Cheers to the anonymous stage tech, the unsung hero!!! Front of house sound despite the awkward position of the stage (and the mixing desk) was top quality, another smooth job thanks to the Minutes long time sound engineer Matt Burgess, he employed wonderful slap-back delay effects on Austin’s vocal and balanced the bands sound despite the mixer desk being positioned in a bass trap. Another unsung hero of the night!
The Minutes ended their explosive set in proper rock n roll fashion
The Minutes live in Harrison's, Blackrock, Co. Louth

“Marcata” (named after the famous upstate New York studio where the band nailed their red-hot 12 track record in 5 days) is available in all good record stores in Ireland and Europe. An essential in any rock music collection. I highly urge you to see the band live when they play in your local town!

Visit THE MINUTES | Debut Album MARCATA now available in Europe on iTunes and all good record stores... for everything Minutes related.